Newsletter 12

The Scientific Method Applied Elsewhere

Those of us with scientific and engineering backgrounds often take certain things for granted, including the benefits of the scientific method and the fact that we can incrementally improve most processes and machinery. But what if politicians also used an engineering mindset and obtained and interpreted data that would help them make informed decisions? Happy reading.

“Big Data” Could Help Solve Canada‚Äôs Productivity Problem

“Research shows analytically driven organizations outperform their competitors, delivering 49% higher revenue growth, 20 times more profit growth, and a 3% higher return on invested capital.” Better quantitative understanding of technical and other issues promotes superior decisions.

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Financial Post, August 2012


The Systems Engineering Imperative

The Systems Engineering Imperative

This brief summary outlines some best practices for ensuring quality in complex designs. Though software-focused, the lessons are applicable to all complex products. As technology advances make projects more elaborate, it is important to treat engineering methodically.

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Design World, September 2012


“Listen” to Bearings

Even something as mundane as the application of grease to a bearing can be improved by innovative thinking. Adding an acoustic unit to give feedback helps prevent under or over-greasing. How can clever engineering
make your processes more efficient and effective?

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SA Mechanical Engineer, June 2012


Randomized Trials of Government Policies

Randomized Trials of Government Policies

What if governments used the scientific method to decide which policies and programs to fund? The benefits may not be as obvious to politicians as to engineers.

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Bad Science, June 2012


Battling Bad Science

Ben Goldacre recounts his fight against misleading pharamaceutical trials in this video clip.

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TED Talks, July 2011